102 S. Pine Street
Canby, OR 97013
Phone: 503-266-2244


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Cement

We sell cement in 94 lb. bags and Premix concrete in 60 lb. bags

To make a yard of concrete:
1 bag = Approx. 1/2 cubic feet
56 - 60 lb bags of Premix = 1 yard
5 - 94 lb bags of Cement + sand and gravel= 1 yard
5 - 94 lb bags of Cement makes 80 sq. ft. 3 1/2" thick

To make mortar mix, use:
1 part Cement
3 1/2 parts Sand
1/2 part Fire clay (for chimney) -or- 1/2 part Lime (for foundation)

To make concrete from scratch:
1 part Cement
2 parts Sand
3 parts Gravel

Doors
Information on Doors:

R.O. equals 2" over door size and 1-1/2" in height

To determine swing, stand in opening, put your rear end to the hinge side. Which ever way your hand swings, is the swing of the door.

Storm Doors swings are usually determined by which side hinges are on, usually do it the opposite of what the door is.

HL means hinge left, not left hand.

Metal or Wood Door Handing 
(Viewed from Outside)

Swing-out
Single Doors with out swing Sill
Right Hand Left Hand

Swing-in
Single Doors with Inswing Sill
Left Hand Right Hand

Double Doors With Outswing Sill
Double Doors With Outswing Sill

Bypass Finished Opening

Panel Height Plus 1 1/2" 
Total of 2 Panel Widths Minus 1" 
Total of 3 Panel Widths Minus 1"
BiFold Finished Opening

Callout Panel Height Plus 5/8" 
Callout Width
Pocket Door Rough Opening

Single Door Width--Double Panel Width Plus 2" 
Double Door Width - Each Panel Width x 4 Plus 2" 
Height - Panel Height Plus 4"

Egress

Egress (escape) requirements:
A. Must have one escape window, or door out of each bedroom. (A den with a closet with a shelf and a pole is a bedroom)

B. UBC specifications:
1. 20" minimum clear opening width
2. 24" minimum clear opening height
3. 5.7 sq. feet clear unobstructed opening
4. 44' maximum distance from floor to sill

C. Provide only one lock mechanism

D. Minimum standard sizes:

4036 slider; 2640 or 3036 full casement 
3050 single hung with 30" vent setting 
 

Ladders

Information on Ladders:

Standard Attic ladder rough opening is 22-1/2 by 54".
 

Safety Glass Requirements

Information on Safety Glass Requirements:

A. Within 24' of a door (except glass with a least dimension of 4" or less),
measured from the radius of the door in the closed position to the edge
of the glass.
EXCEPTION: Glass 5 feet above floor level.

B. Over tub/shower, up to 5' above the rim of the tub and up to 6' above the
sill of a shower.

C. Within 18" above walking surface.
EXCEPTIONS: 1. Glass less than 9 square feet.
2. Glass protected by a horizontal bar (mullion) at least
1-1/2" wide, between 24" and 36" above the floor.

D. All skylights or overhead glazings.

Skylights

Information on Skylights:

A 2-0 x 2-0 skylight O.S. Curb 25-1/2 x 25-1/2
A 2-0 x 4-0 skylight O.S. Curb 25-1/2 x 49-1/2
If skylight is above 12' from the floor, it must be laminated.
If glass area is greater than 16 sq. ft., it must be laminated.

How to clean Skylights: 
To clean dirt from skylights, use a mild soap in water and clean with a soft cloth, rise thoroughly and let dry. Use mirror glaze or Lemon pledge and a soft cloth to polish. This will leave the plastic polished and easier to clean the next time.

To clean paint from the plastic, use Mineral Spirits, not Paint thinner!!

To clean sheetrock overspray, take a wet soft cloth and place it on the covered area. Hold for several minutes. Repeat until overspray is soft and use the cleaning instructions.

Windows

Information on Windows:

Window egress minimum requirements: 
XO 4-0 x 3-6.
SH 3-0 x 5-0 30" vertical
Casement 2'6" x 4-0 or 3-0 3-6

Right to Liens
Five Things Every Homeowner Should Know About Construction Liens
By Jonathan M. Norling found on the website www.nwrenovation.com

What is a Lien?
Five Things Every Homeowner Should Know About Construction Liens CCB website has information and forms for both homeowners and contractors. By Jonathan M. Norling Whether you are undertaking a large remodeling project or simply hiring a contractor to paint your house, you need to be aware of a powerful tool contractors in Oregon (as well as most other states) hold that allows them to get paid for their services: the ominous-sounding “Construction Lien.” Under Oregon law, licensed contractors may place a lien on any property where they provide either labor or services. At the very least, the filing of a lien can be a headache resulting in stress and possibly attorney fees; at worst, a lien can lead to the foreclosure of your house and the loss of that beautiful new kitchen that perhaps wasn’t quite paid for. Here are five things every homeowner should know about construction liens, including how to avoid being hit with one, and, if you are in the unfortunate circumstance of having a construction lien placed on your property, how to deal with it. In its simplest form, a lien is a legal document filed with the county clerk which, if properly filed and recorded, gives the holder of the lien an interest in a piece of property. In the most severe situations, a lien holder can force the sale of the property in order to be paid. Just as a mortgage holder can force a foreclosure sale if you do not pay your mortgage, a contractor who has recorded a lien, i.e., filed it with the county clerk, can force the sale of your house as a means of securing payment for his or her services.

What a Lien Is
In its simplest form, a lien is a legal document filed with the county clerk which, if properly filed and recorded, gives the holder of the lien an interest in a piece of property. In the most severe situations, a lien holder can force the sale of the property in order to be paid. Just as a mortgage holder can force a foreclosure sale if you do not pay your mortgage, a contractor who has recorded a lien, i.e., filed it with the county clerk, can force the sale of your house as a means of securing payment for his or her services.

Every Contractor Has a Right to a Lien
Oregon law gives every licensed contractor, including those who only supply (or even rent) equipment on a job, the right to claim a lien. While it is reasonable to assume that the contractor you hire directly has a right to claim a lien if he or she does not get paid, most people don’t realize that the subcontractors hired by that contractor may also have a right to a lien—even if the contractor is paid in full, and even if the subs have never met the homeowners. There are oft-recounted horror stories detailing how homeowners paid their “contractor” in full, only to be hit with liens from that person’s subs! A less than scrupulous contractor may leave you holding the bag, instead choosing to dart off to Mexico rather than pay the people he hired. In turn, these hardworking folks resort to the filing of construction liens in order to get the money they are owed. 

You Have Rights
Fortunately, contractors are required to give you notice of their right to claim a lien, which at least makes you aware of the potential problems that may ensue if you or your contractor does not ensure that everyone working on a job gets paid. While the details of the notice requirements in Oregon’s lien law are complicated, here’s the gist of it: Subcontractors who do not deal with you directly must give you, the owner of a residential property, a “Notice of Right to Lien,” in order to have the ability to claim a lien. This notice must be sent certified mail, and strict time limits apply. While contractors who deal with you directly do not have to provide this formal notice, they must provide an “Information Notice to Owner about Construction Liens” if the amount of the contract is for more than $1,000. Last, any contractor bidding on a residential job must provide potential customers with a “Consumer Notification Form” developed by the Oregon Construction Contractors Board (CCB). The failure to provide these notices may result in the loss of lien rights, so it is in the contractor’s best interests to comply. This in turn makes it less likely that you will end up losing your house as the result of a construction lien.

Don’t Panic
Needless to say, it is always stressful receiving certified mail, especially mail telling you that someone has a right to take away your house. Bear in mind that the filing of a lien and the “perfection” of that lien (a legal term for following the procedure required to turn that piece of paper into a legitimate interest in your house) is an extremely complicated process that must be done with care and precision, and a competent attorney may likely find ways in which the lien is invalid. Also, don’t forget that in almost all cases, the person filing a lien simply wants to get paid and has no interest in actually forcing the sale of your house. Indeed, the law recognizes this, and allows homeowners to post a bond that will be used to pay the lien holder. While panicking serves no useful purpose, receiving a Notice of Right to Lien or even the information sheet about construction liens should serve as a wake-up call and ideally should be enough to force you to learn more about your rights under the law.

Protect Yourself
Finally, it pays to protect yourself. The best piece of advice is to have good communication with your contractor. If you receive a Notice of a Right to a Lien from his or her subs, talk directly to him or her to see what the contractor’s arrangement is with those subs. You can also make any check out jointly to both the contractor and the subcontractor, or you can have your contractor agree to obtain waivers of lien rights from the subs. In any event, there are ample ways to avoid having to pay for a job twice. Hands down, the best resource regarding construction liens in Oregon is the CCB websitewww.ccb.state.or.us, which has information and forms for both homeowners and contractors. When it comes to construction liens, ignorance is not bliss; rather, it may lead to the loss of your house. Therefore, it pays to know about the law and your rights under it so you can protect yourself before it’s too late. Jonathan Norling is a partner in the Portland law firm of Nelson Lovinger Norling Kaufmann LLP, where he specializes in construction and business matters as well as litigation.